Fasting for Fast Weight Loss?

There are so many options when it comes to dieting and losing weight. Fasting is becoming popular and is worth looking into the health benefits and risks before you start this kind of regimen.

In this video, I discuss the recent research revolving around the benefits and the risks of long-term fasting versus intermittent partial day fasting and evening fasting. You may be causing more harm then good if you fast incorrectly. Watch this video for more information on fasting!

 

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Recent research is giving us insight into fasting and how effective and safe it really is. Check out the benefits and the risks of long-term fasting versus intermittent partial day fasting and evening fasting. You may be causing more harm then good if you fast incorrectly. Watch this video for more information on fasting!

A recent study presented at the European Society of Endocrinology meeting found that three months of alternating 24-hours of fasting on one day and eating unrestricted food on the next day caused rats to eat less total food and lose total body fat, but the rats also developed signs of becoming diabetic.

The data showed that extended fasting periods increases free radical production that damages cells that can increase the risk for diabetes.

Intermittent fasting, fasting for less than 24 hours, produces no cell damage and also works for weight loss.

After fasting for more than eight hours, you start to lose body fat because your body is forced to change temporarily from its main energy source of the sugar, glucose, to the fat in your body.

Alternate-day partial fasting has been shown in many studies to help people lose more weight than just restricting calories every day.

Fasting overnight, by avoiding eating in the evening and overnight, is an effective way to lower high blood sugar levels, and high insulin levels, promote weight loss and reduces your chances of heart attacks, strokes, and certain cancers.

If you are thinking about integrating fasting into your life, check with your doctor if you are diabetic, have low blood pressure, take medications, are underweight, have eating disorders, or are pregnant, trying to become pregnant or breastfeeding an infant.

 

This information is provided for educational and entertainment purposes only and does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the practitioner that you received it from. It is not intended as a substitute for professional advice of any kind. HealthNews assumes no responsibility for the use or misuse of this material. It is intended as a sharing of knowledge and information only. HealthNews encourages you to make your own health care decisions based upon your research and in partnership with a qualified healthcare professional.

 

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